Untitled Story: Ch. 3

We rode down the road a while, and my mind started to wander. I thought about what I did yesterday, what I had for breakfast that morning, what I might do tomorrow. As I daydreamed, a man stepped out into the road about 100 feet in front of us. He had a bag in one hand and a pistol in the other, pointed at Chad.

Chad hit the breaks and stopped the SUV in front of the man. It looked like he had just come out of the bank, so I figured it made sense to assume he had just robbed it. Chad and I both put our hands in the air to show that we were at his mercy. He motioned and told us to get out of the SUV.

When I opened my door, Millie jumped into my lap from the back seat, then jumped down out of the SUV. She looked at the man with the gun and began barking at him. The man seemed confused as to what to do. He took a few steps towards Chad, who by this time was standing outside the SUV. When the robber did that, Millie took off and jumped at him.

Millie got ahold of his pant leg and was pulling him away from Chad. Just then I heard a gun shot, and Millie stopped pulling on the robber’s pant leg. As she backed off, the robber dropped his gun and fell forward onto the ground. A man in a suit was standing right outside the front door of the bank, holding another pistol, pointed at the robber.

Apparently, Millie had slowed the robber down and distracted him long enough for the bank manager to grab his gun and head outside after the robber. It was an easy shot across the road and the robber standing still with Millie holding him made for a good target. The bank manager lowered his gun and smiled at Millie.

“Your dog’s a hero, sir. Couldn’t have done it without her. Thank you young men for your help. That man robbed three banks near here just this week, and shot and killed two innocent people. It’s a big relief to know he’s finished.”

“I’m just glad he didn’t try to shoot Millie,” said Chad. “I don’t know what I’d do without her. “She sure was brave,” I said. “No telling what would have happened to us if she hadn’t intervened.” Millie walked over to Chad and stood on her hind legs. She reached her front paws up to Chad’s shoulders and licked him in the face. “Good dog,” said Chad. “Very good dog.”

Untitled Story: Ch. 2

We drove through the town and I saw many small-town-like things, giving me a comfortable small-town-like feeling. I looked out the window and saw many people doing just the sort of thing one would expect people in a small town to be doing. It was all very comforting and I felt safe and calm.

Chad stopped the SUV at a gas station, where he said he was going to get some gas. I stepped out of the car and told Chad I’d be right back. I needed to use the toilet, but when I entered the store, I didn’t see a sign for a restroom. I asked the cashier if she had a restroom. She said it was on the outside of the building in the back.

She handed me a red block of wood that said “Men” in black print. It had a hole drilled through one end and a thin chain passed through it. The chain had a key on it. I walked out the door and looked at Chad, who was still pumping gas. I held up the red block of wood with the key dangling from it and Chad saw me and nodded his head.

I went towards the back of the building, noticing, as I glimpsed the darkening sky, that it was dusk. I prayed the bathroom had a working light. No telling how clean it would be or what it could be infested with. These outside-type restrooms weren’t usually the best, in my experience.

I unlocked the door and pushed the door open. I reached in and felt the wall for a light switch. I found it and flipped the switch, feeling a sense of relief when the light bulb, over the mirror above the sink, came on. I looked down at the toilet to see a daddy long legs crawling across a spider web inside the toilet seat.

I decided I would just stand up and pee, holding the rest for later. I finished, washed my hands and dried them off with a paper towel from the holder on the wall next to the mirror. I locked the door, returned the key to the cashier with a simple “Thank you,” and headed back to Chad’s SUV.

Chad had the motor running and was busy tuning in to some music on the radio. I got in, and he said, “That was quick.” I nodded and replied, “Not the cleanest place. I’ll wait til we get to your place to sit down on the toilet.” “Okay,” was all he said, and he pulled out of the parking lot and back onto the road.

Untitled Story: Ch. 1

I was going somewhere, knowing where I was going, but not satisfied. I was looking forward to going. I had waited a long time to be going and I had known for a long time where I would be going.

In the process of going, I boarded a train. It was a quiet train, and there wasn’t much to do but look out the window at, first, the city, then, the country, going by, or, rather that which the train was going by. I was sitting in a seat, thinking about nothing. I thought about nothing for a long time.

After another long time had passed, we arrived at a train station. At first I got excited because I thought maybe it could be time to get off. I was soon disappointed as the conductor called out the name of a city which was not where I was going. It looked like an interesting little town, but not interesting enough to make me get off the train before I got to where I was going.

After all, there would be someone waiting to meet me when I got to where I was going. It wouldn’t be considerate to get off early and not be there to get off the train when it got to where I was supposed to be going. The person who would be there to meet me would not be very pleased to see that I was not on the train anymore.

So, I stayed on the train for a while longer. In fact, it was a long while. The train stopped five times before it arrived at the station where I was supposed to get off. I said goodbye to the family that I was sitting with on the train and wished them good luck in their endeavors. They did the same towards me, and I smiled and waved to them before stepping down out of the train.

As I walked towards the station, my friend came walking towards me. He smiled and waved and I smiled and waved back at him. He offered to take my bag, but I told him thank you but I would carry it. We walked through the station and out the front door to the parking lot. My friend pointed to a large, blue SUV and said that was his vehicle.

My friend, whose name is Chad, took my bag and put it in the back of the SUV. When he opened the cargo door, a large, handsome dog stuck his head up from the back seat and licked Chad’s hand. “Hello, Millie,” Chad said, and he patted the dog on the head. Then he took a step back and closed the door. We both got into the front seats and headed on our way down the road towards the town where Chad and Millie live.

Changes of Scenery

I was walking down an alley, and when I got to the end of the alley, I jumped up and over the wall. When I landed on my feet on the other side I realized I had entered a lush garden with grass, flowers, bushes and trees. The pathway was made of brick, and there were pools and fountains here and there among the vegetation.

I walked around a little bit, and, looking down into one of the pools, I noticed it was quite deep. I stepped up onto the brick border around the pool, then leaped in, feet first. As I suspected, I sunk down pretty far. I swam around a bit, then came up for a breath. When I did, I was quite surprised.

The beautiful garden was gone. In its place was a factory, with giant machines all around. There were also huge vats sunk into the concrete floor. The vats were made of a thick glass, and I could see a short way into each vat from inside one of the vats, which is where I was. I propped myself up on the side of the vat I was in, and lifted myself out of the vat.

A Little Bit of Time

Lacking love, the lonely soldier called out to the trees, “Is there an answer?” He scratched his head. His name was Jack. Jack was standing outside his house, in the yard. He walked over to the well and took off the cover. He looked down into the well and shouted, “Well? Is there an answer?” He bent over and rubbed his knee. It was humid today. Earlier in the day, it had rained. It felt like it might rain some more before the day was over.

Jack walked over to his car and reached into his pants pocket for his keys. He pressed the remote button to unlock the door. He pulled the door open and stooped down to get into the driver’s seat. He put the car key into the ignition and revved the motor a little bit. He reached up to the power switch for the radio and turned it on.

Jack had put down his dog, Ralph, just the other day. He missed Ralph. Ever since then, Jack had been in a fog. He guessed he was probably depressed. Jack turned off the radio and switched the car off. He got out of the car and walked towards the house. He opened the back door and walked through the laundry room and into the kitchen.

Jack was feeling sort of hungry, so he opened the refrigerator and looked around. There wasn’t much in there that was ready to eat. He closed the fridge and walked over to the cupboard. He opened the door and saw a bag of tortilla chips. He was in the mood for something salty, so he took the bag and sat down at the kitchen table.

He ate a few chips, and then decided he’d take a nap. He walked into his bedroom and turned down the sheet and blanket. He took off his shirt, then his shoes and socks, then his pants. He felt a little bit of a chill, then got into bed. It had been a rough week. Jack had lost Ralph, then had a busy week at work. He was ready for a break.

And, Chapter 2: School

And was hungry. She had forgotten to pack a lunch. All she could think about was But. In Trigonometry class, she couldn’t stand to think about math. The same went for Chemistry and English. She felt like everyone was always watching her. She knew that wasn’t true, but she couldn’t shake the feeling.

In the cafeteria, she spotted Comma. He was sitting with his buddies, eating a leftover ham sandwich. She walked over to him and said, “Let me have a couple bites–I forgot my lunch.” Comma dug his wallet out of his pocket. “Here’s five dollars,” he said, and handed her a five dollar bill. “You owe me eighteen dollars, now.” “Thanks!” she said. “I’ll pay you back tonight.”

And bought some greasy cheese pizza and some corn, a chocolate milk and an apple juice. It wasn’t gourmet, but it tasted pretty good. She didn’t usually sit with Comma, but today was an exception. Borrowing money always seemed to bond her to a person. She ate quietly and didn’t say a word until the bell rang. She was just drinking her last sip of apple juice. She hurried over to the trash can and dumped her lunch tray, then put the tray and the silverware on it onto the conveyor belt to the dishwasher.

And’s last two class periods of the day were both chorus. In the first period they warmed up their voices, did sight reading and went over difficult parts that they had trouble with. During the second period they practiced a broadway medley, and then split into groups to come up with choreography. Sometimes they went on field trips to retirement homes, during Christmastime they gave outdoor concerts, and at Valentine’s Day they did singing telegrams around school as a fundraiser.

After school, And and Comma met each other at the bus. Luckily, they got on before Cheese and his buddies, so they got their seats without any trouble. And sat next to the window. She opened it and felt the cool breeze. She enjoyed the warm sun on her face and dozed a little on the trip home. They got off a couple blocks from their house, which was as close as the bus stopped. And raised her hands in a hallelujah gesture and yelled, “Yea! But comes back tomorrow!” Comma smirked. He was sorta glad, too. His sister was always more agreeable when she was in love.

And, Chapter 1: And and Comma

And was sad. But had been gone for three weeks. She got up from her bed and went down the hall, to her brother, Comma’s room. Comma was blow drying his hair into a feathery mess in the bathroom across the hall. He didn’t notice And pass by. And mistook Comma for her sister If, who usually hogs the bathroom. When And saw that Comma was not in his bedroom, she walked back to the bathroom. And said to Comma, “I miss But.”

Comma turned off the blow dryer and said, “What?” “I miss But,” And repeated. “He’s been gone for three weeks,” said And. “I understand, And. But he will be back tomorrow,” said Comma. “What if he doesn’t come to school tomorrow?” said And. Comma grimaced. “Oh, C’mon, And! You’re just making up things to worry about, now,” said Comma. And smiled. “Yeah, I guess you’re right. There’s no reason for But to not come to school.” And breathed a sigh of relief. “Thanks, little bro. You’re always good at thinking rational,” said And.

And and Comma got on the bus that morning at their bus stop. As Comma made his way down the aisle of the bus, a pimply boy with big ears stuck his foot out to trip Comma. Comma was ready for it though, as the boy, whose name is Cheese, did the same thing every morning. Watch it, Cheese!” said Comma. Two boys, one short and round, the other tall and skinny, stood up, bending over, under the low roof. “What are you going to do about it, Comma?” the short one said. “I’m not in the mood for your crap today, Rock. Same to you, Block,” said Comma.

“Comma, please take a seat,” said the bus driver, whose name was Bounce. “Block and Rock, you two sit down.” By then Cheese had pulled his leg back in, not wanting to be reported by Bounce. “Hurry up!” said And to Comma. And was used to the shenanigans of these delinquents, and didn’t waste her breath on them. “I want to get this day over with!”

Adventures of a Blob

There was once a little blob. Then it grew legs and went around the block. It passed an alley where he saw another blob getting mugged by two other blobs. He thought about crying out, “Police!” But he was scared they might have guns, so he continued on his merry way around the block. He smelled cinnamon rolls cooking in a bakery, and then he stopped to buy one from the blob in the store. His day was going pretty well until he got to an open manhole in the street, which he fell into when he didn’t see it. It was pretty nasty down in the sewer, but he was a blob, and they don’t worry about such things.

The Cube: Ch. 7, Taking a Ride

Rolph pressed a button on the counter and a cup with a liquid in it rose up on a platform even to the counter. “Care for a drink?” Rolph asked me, with a smile. “What is it?” I said. “Coffee,” he said. “Okay, I’ll try it,” I said, smiling. The drink tasted like normal coffee. “Hmm,” I said. “Pretty good.”

Johnny seemed bored. “Well, I’m goin’ fishin’. Anyone want to come?” “I’ve gotta get back to my chores,” said Wayne, with a shrug. “Have a nice day, Wayne and Johnny,” I said. Both of them walked out the side door. “Whatcha say, we take this thing for a spin?” I said, smiling.

“Billah doesn’t prefer to be referred to as a thing,” Rolph said. “Billah, take us for a ride around the forest.” The walls took on a warm pink tone, and then we lifted up into the air. “I can’t figure out what makes her go,” I said. Rolph smiled, then said, “it’s air displacement, like a jet engine.” “No noise, though,” I said. “Correct,” Rolph said. “It’s a little more advanced. No propellers. Just a vacuum.” “But a vacuum makes noise,” I said. “Yes. It uses the physics of a black hole,” said Rolph. “We haven’t totally figured them out yet,” I said. “Indeed,” said Rolph.

An Afternoon at the Beach

I wandered out of a cave next to the ocean. I bent down and picked up a sea shell, looked at it for a few seconds, then skipped it across the water. I looked down the beach, and saw a boy on a skim board, riding the waves in to the beach. He looked like he was having a great time.

I looked out at the ocean and saw a cruise ship sailing by. Then I saw a killer whale break the surface of the water and crash back down into the waves. Down the beach, there was a pier extending out into the water. A man on the pier who was fishing saw the whale and shouted to the boy to get into the beach.

The man fishing gave me an idea. I decided I’d get out my fishing pole and see if I could catch me some dinner. I attached a hook to my line and got out a bucket with some shrimp that I had caught earlier with a net. I put one of the shrimp on the hook and tossed the line out into the water.