Instruction and Institution

Ask a question.

Doubt a lie.

Tell a story.

Is it true?

Someone wrote it.

Someone made it up

In their head.

Could it have come from God?

Not directly, surely.

No mountaintop bestowal

Of stone tablets.

And whether or not

THAT happened, is questionable.

It makes for a great story, though,

And the story is useful

For instruction and institution.

Let’s just leave it at that.

A Boy and His Boat, Ch. 1

There was once a little boy. He lived by a lake. He had learned how to swim, and he was quite good at it. One day, during summer vacation, he was out by the lake, watching the fish swim around in the water, and the frogs jumping and croaking, and the minnows scattering each time he touched the water with the end of a stick. He thought to himself that it would be great fun to have a boat. He considered for a while what he might need to make one. He thought of wood, and a hammer and nails. He knew that would make a nice box, but he wasn’t sure if it would float. He was afraid it might sink to the bottom. He decided he would ask his father if he would help him build a boat. He knew his father had worked on a boat when he was younger, and the boy hoped he would know some of the tricks to make it float.

True for You

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Little trigger happy elf,
Sauntering down the road,
Can you tell me
What life is all about?

Pretty dream girl,
Can you tell me of
Sad stories, but true,
Scars to sympathize with you?

Happy baby,
Bouncing on
Your Daddy’s knee,
Can you tell me

What you will see
In this great big world,
Eventually?
I wonder.

We all have stories
That we can tell.
We all know mysteries
That we can share.

We know things,
From insight
And experience,
And, perhaps,

From God.
What is true for you,
May be true for me, too.
But, then again,

Maybe not.
But, perhaps,
That is another truth
In itself.