“Anxiety, Religion and Medicine”, excerpt from The Courage to Be, by Paul Tillich

Principles of existential anxiety and pathological anxiety:

1. Existential anxiety has an ontological character and cannot be removed but must be taken into the courage to be.
2. Pathological anxiety is the consequence of the failure of the self to take the anxiety upon oneself.
3. Pathological anxiety leads to self-affirmation on a limited, fixed, and unrealistic basis and to a compulsory defense of this basis.
4. Pathological anxiety, in relation to the anxiety of fate and death, produces an unrealistic security; in relation to the anxiety of guillt and condemnation, an unrealistic perfection; in relation to the anxiety of doubt and meaninglessness, an unrealistic certitude.
5. Pathological anxiety, once established, is an object of medical healing. Existential anxiety is an object of priestly help. Neither the medical nor the priestly function is bound to its vocational representatives: the minister may be a healer and the psychotherapist a priest, and each human being may be both in relation to the “neighbor”. But the functions should not be confused and the representatives should not try to replace each other. The goal of both of them is helping men to reach full self-affirmation, to attain the courage to be.

–from “The Courage to Be”, by Paul Tillich

Advertisements

Author: Gordon S. Bowman III

Writer, Visual Artist, Blogger, Advocate

1 thought on ““Anxiety, Religion and Medicine”, excerpt from The Courage to Be, by Paul Tillich”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s